California’s La Brea Tar Pits are no strangers to Ice Age fossils, but recently some prehistoric bees found in them in the 70s have been getting some extra attention.<br /> <br />California’s La Brea Tar Pits are no strangers to Ice Age fossils, but recently some prehistoric bees found in them in the 70s have been getting some extra attention. <br /><br />When they were originally collected, the technology to examine them without destroying the specimens wasn’t yet available. <br /><br />Now, thanks to micro-CT scanners available to do the delicate job, researchers were able to generate a 3-D model of the bee pupae by joining over 2 thousand scan slices. <br /><br />As a result of their research so far, the scientists believe that the fossils were found in the same place they once lived, as opposed to being moved there over time.<br /><br /> The bees are estimated to be 23 to 40 thousand years old. <br /><br />That discovery is particularly exciting for some, as it means much information about climate and survival can potentially be learned.<br /><br />Scientists are hopeful that learning more about that relationship in prehistoric times can shed light on the changes that occurred southern California back then. <br /><br />Said one of the team members, "these specimens frequently serve as the most valuable paleoenvironemental indicators due to their narrow climate restrictions and life cycles."

Ice-Age Bees Discovered in Tar Pits

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